Sunday, July 7, 2013

Installation Guide for Fedora 19

Update: To install Fedora 20, please refer to Installation guide for Fedora 20.

The following guide contains the installation procedure for Fedora 19. This procedure was tested on a HP laptop with dual core AMD processor and 4GB of RAM using a USB external hard disk. I boot the Fedora Live from a USB stick and install the entire OS on an external (USB) hard disk.

For installation of Fedora 19 on virtual machine, please refer to Install Fedora 19 on VirtualBox with Guest Additions. For Compiz fan, please refer to the post Install Fedora 19 Mate Compiz Spin. For netinstall, refer to Install Fedora 19 using Netinstall.

Creation of Media

Since I am tired of burning the Live DVD on a blank disc. I decided to create a boot USB stick instead. The procedure on creating bootable USB can be found on the official Fedora documentation here. For details of creating a bootable USB drive, please refer to my post here on creating USB drive.


Installing Fedora 19

Start your computer. You might need to press extra key at the beginning so that you can boot Fedora 19 from USB drive. In my case, a HP laptop, I need to press Esc and then F9. Most other computer uses F9 or F10 or F11. Please refer to the user guide of your computer.

Once you've bootup Fedora 19. You are given a choice to install into a hard disk.


Click Install to Hard Drive. The first screen of installation wizard is shown below.


Select the language and make sure you check Set keyboard to default layout for selected language.


On the installation summary, you'll notice that there is a warning sign on installation destination. You need to confirm the installation target drive. Click on INSTALLATION DESTINATION.


There are 2 disk available. I will be installing Fedora 19 on WD1600JS. This is an external USB hard disk. Click to select the disk you want to configure. Click Done on the top left corner.


In this dialog box, you can choose to let the system configure the partition for you, you just need to specify the partition scheme. You can also configure the partition manually. This time, I decided to configure the partitions manually. Click Continue. (For new Linux users who want to know more about Linux partitions, please refer to my post Linux Partitions)


In this summary screen for manual partition, click + on the lower left corner to create a new partition. The first partition is the boot partition. 500MB is sufficient.


The next partition is swap partition. The recommend size for swap file is two times of your system RAM. However, due to RAM size getting larger and swap is seldom utilized. It is recommended to give the swap file 4GB of space, even if you have 16GB of RAM.


The last partiton is the root partition, you can use the entire free disk space to allocate to the root partition. Leave the capacity blank.


The summary of partition is as follows:


Click Done when you complete your configuration. The next dialog box shows the summary of all your actions.


Click Accept Changes to commit the changes. You will be shown the Configuration Summary. Review the summary page and change any setting such as time zone or keyboard. Click Begin Installation.


Once the installation starts, in the meantime, you can set the root password and add user. Click ROOT PASSWORD.


Enter the root password and click Done when ready. Click USER CREATION.


Enter the user name and set the user password. Make sure you check Make this user administrator. Click Done when ready. 


Wait for the installation to complete.


Click Quit on the lower right corner when installation is complete. You can reboot the system. The login screen:


The desktop is shown as below:


The following dialog box will be shown for the first time:


Select English and click Next.


This allows you to add different input sources. Click Next.


This dialog box allows you to configure online accounts. Click Next.


Click Start using GNOME 3. This completes the installation.

Updating the System
Click Activities and type in Terminal on the search box. Launch the terminal.

Use the following command to update the system

sudo yum update

Once the update is complete, restart the machine. Usually there is no need to restart the machine after the update. However, you need to restart the system if you've just update a new kernel.

After updating the system, you might want to install addition software. Please refer to Fedora 19 Post Installation Software Configuration Guide




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